Dry Eye

What is dry eye syndrome?

Dry eye syndrome (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) is a chronic reduction in the quantity or quality of tears, causing insufficient lubrication of the eye. It can cause mild to severe discomfort and damage to the tissues of the surface of the eye - the cornea and conjunctiva.

What are the symptoms of dry eye syndrome?

Symptoms of dry eye syndrome include:

What causes dry eye syndrome?

The normal tear film of the eye has three components:

Water

Most of our tear film is composed of a watery substance, secreted by the lacrimal glands which are located above and behind our upper eyelids. This watery (or aqueous) component of our tears nourishes and cleans the cornea and other tissues on the front of the eye.

Oils

Oils secreted from Meibomian glands (located at the margins of our eyelids) help keep our tears from evaporating too quickly.

Mucin

Mucin is a mucous-like substance that is produced by cells in the conjunctiva and outer surface of the eye. It helps tears spread more easily across the cornea. A deficiency in the quantity or quality of any of these three components of the tear film can cause dry eye syndrome.A deficiency in the watery component of tears is known as Aqueous Tear Deficiency (ATD). Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is the medical term used to describe dry eye syndrome resulting from ATD. A more common form of dry eye is Evaporative Dry Eye which is related to meibomian gland dysfunction and blepharitis.  

How can I reduce my risk of dry eye syndrome?

To reduce your risk of dry eyes, take the following precautions:



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